November 2010 Meeting 

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                                                                                                                                                                                       We are very fortunate in the North East Chapter to have so many members who are willing to demonstrate and share their skills and techniques with us on a regular basis. Gerard Corrigan took centre stage at our November demonstration where he shared his methods to turn apples, pears and eggs.

Gerard Corrigan November 2010

Gerard Corrigan - November 2010

 

His first project was an apple made from Ash, and as an alternative to using a screw chuck, he used his own homemade spring chuck.  The basic design consisted of a 75mm length of wood hollowed out to the approximate size of an apple with a spigot for mounting in a standard chuck.  A hole was bored through the centre of the spigot to facilitate pushing out the apple should this prove necessary.  The sides of the unit contained eight equally spaced slots, and at the bottom of each slot, a 5mm hole was drilled to give the chuck its expansion capacity.  The apple was turned to a cylinder and sized between centers, ensuring to mark the centre point at each end, ensuring that the minimum amount of turning was left for completion when transferred to the expansion chuck.  The blossom end was turned first, lightly sanded and finished by applying friction polish.  The apple was then reversed in the spring chuck to complete the stem end.  The stem was turned with the aid of a smaller spring chuck, which could also be very useful for holding finials and fine work.  The blossom end was drilled and a clove glued into place, followed by the stem end which was drilled at a slight angle, and the stem glued into position.   

 

Gerard Corrigan Fruit - November 2010

Gerard Corrigan Fruit - November 2010 

 

The pear was turned from plum branch wood using similar methods, and the egg was crafted from apple branch wood – an interesting demo combined with a robust exchange of wit.